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Archive for May, 2009

Queen Rania on You Tube

May 31st, 2009 No comments

Queen Rania of Jordan has channel on You Tube!!!
queen_rania

here is one subject she handles: Arab Women

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Karen Armstrong: Charter for Compassion

May 31st, 2009 No comments
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Samia Shoaib: A Story of Compassion

May 31st, 2009 1 comment
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Taking the Fifth

May 31st, 2009 No comments

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The Judge asked the defendant, “Mullah Nasruddin, do you understand that you have sworn to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?”
“I do,” nodded the Mulla.
“Now what do you have to say to defend yourself?”
“Your Honor,‘ replied Nasrudin: ‘under those limitations … I have nothing to say.“

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The right to change one’s religion

May 30th, 2009 No comments

adhami

From the Code of Hammurabi to the Code of Maimonides, most major systems of law have affirmed that apostasy must be punished.

In the renowned code of the Roman emperor Justinian (483-565 CE), corpus juris civilis – the basis of all Roman canon law and of modern civil law — apostasy was “to be punished by death” and there was “no toleration of dissent”.

The Biblical codes stipulate that the “one who doubts or ridicules one word of the Torah— or of the rabbinical authors — is a ‘heretic’ in the fullest sense, an infidel … and there is no hope for him.” The laws concerning such an unbeliever are very strict: “he may be killed directly,” or as Maimonides, the 13th century Andalucian rabbi and philosopher, advised regarding navigating the abeyance of apostasy law in his era, “his death may be caused indirectly.”

Islamic law (shari‘a) likewise stipulated killing in cases of established public apostasy. Though there is little literature on the emergence and application of apostasy law in the early periods of Muslim history, its actual application usually depended upon whether its declaration was public or private. Within the Islamic state, what minorities — religious and otherwise — did in their private lives was left to their discretion, even if it may have been technically termed “deviant” or against Islamic teaching.
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Categories: Abdallah Adhami, Articles Tags:

Imam al-Busiri: Qasida Mudariyya

May 30th, 2009 No comments

Qasida Mudariyya is another qasidah by Imam Sharafuddin al-Busiri (Imam al-Busiri) along with the more well known Qasidah Burdah which is widely recited throughout the world to this day.

Qasida Mudariyya was penned in two stages, one before he went to hajj and the rest after.

Imam al-Busiri was a sufi of the Shadhili order who took ijaza from Sheikh Abul ‘Abbas al-Mursi who was a direct student of Imam Abul Hasan ash-Shadhili.

This qasida below is sung by Shaykh Diya. Click  here to view the text in arabic/english

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Getting Rid of the Need to Obtain People’s Approval

May 30th, 2009 2 comments

 

O disciple, strive to purify your heart both from the fear of people and from putting your hopes in them, for this would make you remain silent when faced with falsehood, compromise your religion, and neglect enjoining good and forbidding evil. This would be ample humiliation. A believer is strong by his Lord; he feels no fear nor hope except with regard to Him.

When one of your brother Muslims offers you something by way of showing affection, take it if you need it, but thank Allah, for He is the real giver, and thank the one whom Allah has chosen to deliver it to you.  If you do not need it, see whether it would be better for your heart to take it or refuse it.  If you refuse, do it tactfully so as not to hurt the heart of the giver, for the feelings of a Muslim are of consequence to God.

Beware of refusing for the sake of acquiring a reputation, or of accepting for your appetites. However, to accept for your appetites is better than turning something down to acquire a reputation of asceticism and of turning away from the world. The truthful will not be confused, for his Lord gives him a light in his heart by which he knows what is required of him.

-Imam ‘Abdallah ibn ‘Alawi al-Haddad, Two Treatises of Imam al-Haddad

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Former Preacher Yusuf Estes explain’s the Christian Trinity

May 26th, 2009 1 comment
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Imam Ghazali – Last Qasida

May 23rd, 2009 No comments

Imam Ghazali woke up one early morning and as usual offered his prayers and then enquired what day it was, his younger brother, Ahmad Ghazali replied,”Monday.” He asked him to bring his white shroud, kissed it, stretched himself full length and saying “Lord, I obey willingly,” breathed his last.
And underneath his head rest they found the following verses; composed by him, probably, during the night.


Say to my friends, when they look upon me, dead
Weeping for me and mourning me in sorrow

Do not believe that this corpse you see is myself
In the name of God, I tell you, it is not I,

I am a spirit, and this is naught but flesh
It was my abode and my garment for a time.

I am a treasure, by a talisman kept hid,
Fashioned of dust, which served me as a shrine,

I am a pearl, which has left it’s shell deserted,
I am a bird, and this body was my cage

Whence I have now floron forth and it is left as a token
Praise to God, who hath now set me free

And prepared for me my place in the highest of the heaven,
Until today I was dead, though alive in your midst.

Now I live in truth, with the grave – clothes discarded.
Today I hold converse with the saints above,

With no veil between, I see God face to face.
I look upon “Loh-i-Mahfuz” and there in I read
Whatever was and is and all that is to be.

Let my house fall in ruins, lay my cage in the ground,
Cast away the talisman, it is a token, no more

Lay aside my cloak, it was but my outer garment.
Place them all in the grave, let them be forgotten,

I have passed on my way and you are left behind
Your place of abode was no deweling place for me.

Think not that death is death, nay, it is life,
A life that surpasses all we could dream of here,
While in this world, here we are granted sleep,
Death is but sleep, sleep that shall be prolonged

Be not frightened when death draweth night,
It is but the departure for this blessed home
Think of the mercy and love of your Lord,
Give thanks for His Grace and come without fear.

What I am now, even so shall you be
For I know that you are even as I am
The souls of all men come forth from God
The bodies of all are compounded alike

Good and evil, alike it was ours
I give you now a message of good cheer
May God’s peace and joy for evermore be yours.”

Categories: General Tags:

Mojud: The Man with the Inexplicable Life

May 23rd, 2009 No comments

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There was once a man named Mojud. He lived in a town where he had obtained a post as a small official, and it seemed likely that he would end his days as inspector of weights and measures.

One day when he was walking through the gardens of an ancient building near his home, Khidr, the mysterious guide of the Sufis, appeared to him, dressed in shimmering green. Khidr said, “Man of bright prospects! Leave your work and meet me at the riverside in three days’ time. ” Then he disappeared. Mojud went to his superior in trepidation and said that he had to leave. Everyone in the town soon heard of this and they said, “Poor Mojud! He has gone mad.” But, as there were many candidates for his job, they soon forgot him.

On the appointed day, Mojud met Khidr, who said to him, “Tear your clothes and throw yourself into the stream. Perhaps someone will save you.” Mojud did so, even though he wondered if he were mad. Since he could swim, he did not drown, but drifted a long way before a fisherman hauled him into his boat, saying, “Foolish man! The current is strong. What are you trying to do?” Mojud said, “I don’t really know.” “You are mad,” said the fisherman, “But I will take you into my reed-hut by the river yonder, and we shall see what can be done for you.”

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